Education

The Ministry of Education has issued a warning to parents and students who are working with ed-tech companies.

According to the ministry, parents, students, and other stakeholders in school education should be cautious while using online curriculum and coaching given by a range of Ed-tech companies.
On Thursday, the Education Ministry published a detailed advise to parents and kids engaging with ed-tech companies, advising them, among other things, to be cautious while making payments. According to the recommendation, they should avoid paying subscription fees by automatic debit.

“Some ed-tech businesses are enticing parents by promising free services in exchange for signing the Electronic Fund Transfer (EFT) mandate or activating the Auto-debit feature, particularly targeting vulnerable families,” the ministry stated in a statement.
Due to the pervasiveness of technology in education, several ed-tech companies have begun offering courses, tutorials, and coaching for competitive and other tests in an online format, according to the ministry.
According to the ministry, parents, students, and other stakeholders in school education should be cautious while using online curriculum and coaching given by a range of Ed-tech companies.

Students

“Some ed-tech companies may employ the Free-Premium business model, in which many of their services appear to be free at first appearance, but students must pay for ongoing access to learning.” “Activating auto-debit may result in a youngster accessing the paid features without realising that he or she is no longer accessing the free services offered by the ed-tech provider,” according to the warning.

Users should also seek a tax invoice statement for educational devices with pre-loaded content, app purchases, and Pendrive learning, according to the website.

“Avoid signing up for any debts you don’t fully comprehend.” It is not a good idea to install any mobile ed-tech applications without first checking their validity. When signing up for app subscriptions, avoid using credit or debit cards. According to the recommendation, set a restriction on how much you can spend per transaction.

It also advised children not to enter personal information online, such as email addresses, phone numbers, credit card numbers, or addresses, because this information could be sold or misused later.

“Do not use social media to share intimate films or images.” It’s best to avoid using the video feature or conducting video calls on an untrustworthy platform. Keep your child’s safety in mind at all times. It recommended against enrolling in unconfirmed courses because they make deceptive claims.

It also warned against uncritically trusting “success tales” from ed-tech companies, since they could be a gimmick to recruit additional consumers.

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